Write your book: The sticky metaphor of duct tape

Of course, one of the most popular tapes is duct tape. Tim Nyberg, who has
co-written seven books on the subject, including “The Jumbo Duct Tape Book”
and “Duct Shui,” calls it a panacea.

“It’s easy to use, you can rip it with your bare hands, and it doesn’t come
with any instructions, so it doesn’t limit creativity,” he said.

I read this in a New York Times article this morning about the coming wave of gecko-inspired tapes. That final quote, about not coming with instructions, and thus not limiting creativity, gave me a pleasant jolt.

Is my writing that way? Does it induce an experience in the reader that allows them to step into new creative paths?

Being a word person, I was not surprised to learn that I was not the only person to hear, “duck tape,” when someone said, “duct tape.” (Go to old Prairie Home Companion episodes for extensive wonderful exploration of this theme.) That aspect of duct tape is also inspiring: Will what I call my products be as sticky?

Which thought leads me to a book every marketer should read: Made to Stick, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath.

Be sticky. Write better. Name well.

Words Matter Week 2010

Words matter. Words matter to me a great deal. And as I’ve just learned, there are many others, including the the National Association of Independent Writers and Editors, to whom words matter, too. To learn more about Words Matter Week, click here.

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